Home » Author Archives: Peter Ellis

Author Archives: Peter Ellis

Government Experience Design: Open Source

This is the final post in a series of blog posts expanding on the four ideas I consider central to government experience design: transparency, listening, adaptability, and open source. In all four posts, I aim to provide concrete ideas for how governments can deliberately think about the experience that citizens have when interacting with them. Open Source Open source is ... Read More »

Government Experience Design: Adaptability

This is the third in a series of blog posts expanding on the four ideas I consider central to government experience design: transparency, listening, adaptability, and open-source. In all four posts, I aim to provide concrete ideas for how governments can “design” the experiences that their constituents have when interacting with them. Adaptability When one thinks about adaptability, there are ... Read More »

Government Experience Design: Listening

This is the second in a series of blog posts expanding on the four ideas I consider central to government experience design: transparency, listening, adaptability, and open-source. In all four posts, I aim to provide concrete ideas for how governments can use each of these items to respond to and engage citizens. Listening As someone who wears hearing aids, this is ... Read More »

Government Experience Design: Transparency

This article expands somewhat on each of the four points listed originally in positing the idea of government experience design: transparency, listening, adaptability, and open source. We aim to provide concrete ideas for how each of these items might be implemented within government to improve its ability to respond to and engage citizens. Defining Transparency What is transparency? According to Wikipedia1, Transparency, as used ... Read More »

Government Experience Design: How Do We Make Gov Work?

User experience is one of those fields where it’s easy to have things overhyped. There are enough buzzwords floating around the business world that losing track of what the discipline actually focuses on is a trap easily tripped. There are those that even argue that a laser-like focus on the user neglects other, just as important, aspects of business. But ... Read More »